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Tripp Crouse

News and Public Affairs Producer

Originally from the Midwest, Tripp Crouse (Ojibwe, a descendent of Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa) has 15-plus years in print, web and radio journalism. Tripp first moved to Alaska in 2016 to work with KTOO Public Media in Juneau. And later moved to Anchorage in 2018 to work with KNBA and Koahnic Broadcast Corporation.

As KNBA's News and Public Affairs Producer, Tripp covers Alaska Native and indigenous issues and policies. Tripp also currently serves as chair and represents Alaska Native and tribal radio on the Station Advisory Committee for Native Public Media.

A member of Native American Journalist Association, Alaska Native Media Group and Alaska Press Club, Tripp is an award-winning journalist with the goal of increasing the visibility and representation of indigenous people in media.

Alaska’s governor announced a 182-line item veto to the state operating budget. Those cuts include more than $2 million for public radio and $600,000 for public television.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy spoke about his cuts to public radio and television during a June 28 news conference in Juneau.

A support group for Indigenous LGBTQ and Two Spirit people and their allies wants to let Indigenous queer people have a safe place to connect.

Tui McDermottt, Will  Bean and Jenny Miller founded Aurora Pride, which is a private Facebook group out of respect to members’ privacy and safety.

The trio came into the KNBA Morning Line studio on Friday, June 28, 2019, to talk with Morning Line host Danny Preston.

The Alaska Supreme Court ruled that part of the state’s sex offender registry violates offenders’ rights to due process – and is unconstitutional.

Under state law people found guilty of many sexual-based offenses – such as sexual assault and even some kidnapping charges -- are required to register as a sex offender.

But the court’s 3-to-2 decision says the registry provides no means for offenders to show they are not a threat to public safety.

At the center of the ruling -- a man accused of sexual battery in Virginia moved to Alaska in January 2003.

Health care professionals from all around the world are in Anchorage this week for the ninth annual Southcentral Foundation’s Nuka System of Care Conference.

Dr. Terry Simpson visited KNBA’s studios to talk with Morning Line host Danny Preston about the conference.

A 2017 federal murder case could reach a plea agreement ahead of its September trial date.

On Monday, June 17, a federal judge approved an unopposed motion by the U.S. Attorney to extend a pre-trial deadline to August 12.

The remains of six students from the Carlisle Indian Industrial School will soon be returned to their families.

The children died more than 100 years ago at the school in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.

The Task and Purpose reports that the U.S. Army was scheduled to begin the process of disinterment on Saturday, June 15.

Aaron Walker and Andy Hall are two teachers of about 45 from Southeast Ohio visiting Alaska.

The contingent of educators hopes to learn more about the history of the 49th state, and bring those lessons back to their classrooms.

Near downtown Anchorage’s Ship Creek, an art installation pays tribute to Dena’ina  traditions and culture. And at the center is the bronze representation of one of its matriarchs.

On Small Boat Launch Road, Grandma Olga stands ever vigilant – watching over an area that was a traditional fish camp for the Dena’ina people here -- in what’s present-day Anchorage.

The Alaska Native Heritage Center will celebrate its 20th anniversary on Sunday for Mothers Day. Admission will be free.

Cultural tourism director Ruby Steele says the Heritage Center is "a place to be emersed in the cultural aspects of Alaska's Native people. It's also an educational facility where we do teach education of Alaska Native culture."

King Island Dancers will perform for the opening ceremony. Other performers will be featured.

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