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Tripp Crouse

News and Public Affairs Producer

Originally from the Midwest, Tripp Crouse (Ojibwe, a descendent of Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa) has 15-plus years in print, web and radio journalism. Tripp first moved to Alaska in 2016 to work with KTOO Public Media in Juneau. And later moved to Anchorage in 2018 to work with KNBA and Koahnic Broadcast Corporation.

As KNBA's News and Public Affairs Producer, Tripp covers Alaska Native and indigenous issues and policies. Tripp also currently serves as chair and represents Alaska Native and tribal radio on the Station Advisory Committee for Native Public Media.

A member of Native American Journalist Association, Alaska Native Media Group and Alaska Press Club, Tripp is an award-winning journalist with the goal of increasing the visibility and representation of indigenous people in media.

At the 2019 Elders and Youth Conference, the running theme is “Language is Our Superpower." The elder keynote speaker Sally Tugidm Ayagaa Swetzof (Unangax̂) talked about the importance of keeping Unangam Tunuu alive.

Swetzof was born before Alaska gained statehood. Growing up in Atka, Unangam Tunuu was her first language.

“It wsa the language always spoken at home and in the village when I was growing up,” she said from the mainstage. “Nobody spoke English unless they were talking to the BIA (Bureau of Indian Affairs) teachers or some other non-speakers.”

In Interior Alaska, Athabascan fiddle music is a staple at social gatherings. At the 2019 Elders and Youth conference, elders taught young people how to dance the signature style – called jigging. Gwich'in fiddle player Jerry Frank originally learned to play the guitar, but when older fiddle players passed on – he took up the instrument that’s a signature of Athabascan jigging – a style of square-dancing folk music.

The sight of the new one-dollar coin featuring an Alaska Native leader was met with celebration in Anchorage.

At the Alaska Native Brotherhood and Alaska Native Sisterhood Convention, the U.S. Mint unveiled Saturday the tails design for the 2020 Native American one-dollar coin.

The board of directors of Cook Inlet Region Incorporated, or CIRI, announced Thursday (Aug. 8, 2019) that they would support the effort to recall Governor Mike Dunleavy.

The Anchorage-based Alaska Native corporation made its announcement in an email message to shareholders and on its website.

Ethan Tyler is the director of corporate affairs for CIRI. He says the Recall Dunleavy campaign outlined four points in their messaging that CIRI supports.

Australian mining company PolarX Limited recently fully funded its exploration programs located about 150 miles north of Anchorage. Those programs include potential exploration for copper and gold in the Alaska Range.

In January 2018, PolarX Limited identified a copper-gold target in its Alaska Range Project. Later that year, regional geophysical data confirmed high-grade mineralization.

A junior mining company from Canada is searching for gold in eastern Alaska properties. The largest private landowner in the state, Doyon Limited, an Alaska Native corporation, owns two of the properties.

Alaska’s governor announced a 182-line item veto to the state operating budget. Those cuts include more than $2 million for public radio and $600,000 for public television.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy spoke about his cuts to public radio and television during a June 28 news conference in Juneau.

A support group for Indigenous LGBTQ and Two Spirit people and their allies wants to let Indigenous queer people have a safe place to connect.

Tui McDermottt, Will  Bean and Jenny Miller founded Aurora Pride, which is a private Facebook group out of respect to members’ privacy and safety.

The trio came into the KNBA Morning Line studio on Friday, June 28, 2019, to talk with Morning Line host Danny Preston.

The Alaska Supreme Court ruled that part of the state’s sex offender registry violates offenders’ rights to due process – and is unconstitutional.

Under state law people found guilty of many sexual-based offenses – such as sexual assault and even some kidnapping charges -- are required to register as a sex offender.

But the court’s 3-to-2 decision says the registry provides no means for offenders to show they are not a threat to public safety.

At the center of the ruling -- a man accused of sexual battery in Virginia moved to Alaska in January 2003.

Health care professionals from all around the world are in Anchorage this week for the ninth annual Southcentral Foundation’s Nuka System of Care Conference.

Dr. Terry Simpson visited KNBA’s studios to talk with Morning Line host Danny Preston about the conference.

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