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  • Scene in "When the Moment Comes," in which a prison guard comes to take Dr. Ziaoallah Ahrari away to his execution. Ahrari is played by John Sharify (third from the left), who lost an uncle to religious persecution in Iran. Dannesh Bastani stands to Sharify's left. His character, Hedayat Siyhavashi, begs the guard to let him accompany the doctor.
    Photo courtesy of "When the Moment Comes."
    When the Moment Comes is a play that brings light to a dark chapter in history, based on the true story of Baha'is, who were persecuted for their religious beliefs after the Islamic Revolution in Iran. A story that is both haunting and inspiring — that honors the memories of a group of men and women, executed in 1983 after they refused to renounce their faith.
  • Book recipients from the Tségháhoodzání (Window Rock) event on April 1st.
    Photo provided by Kelly Wood from the SBi Giving Foundation
    Zooming across the Navajo Nation, a new non-profit called NDN Girls Book Club is bringing books written by Indigenous authors to various locations in the Navajo Nation.The team hopes they create community-wide change and education on the extensive world of Indigenous-written literature.
  • This year the Arctic Winter Games were held in the Ma -Su Valley, the first time this international competition has been in Alaska in a decade. Many call this event, which is held once every two years, the Olympics of the North. Alaska governor Wally Hickel and other Arctic Nation leaders founded the Arctic Winter Games in 1959. They believed that the peoples scattered across the Circumpolar North share a mutual identity — and in the case of large countries like Northern Canada and Alaska, perhaps have more in common with the rest of the Arctic than they do with the rest of their own countries.
  • Get out the Native Vote has worked hard to get more Natives to the polls in both local and national elections. Recently, the non-profit has branched out to 45 schools across Alaska.
  • With films like Killers of the Flower Moon winning critical acclaim, Native Americans have a lot to look forward to during this year's Academy Awards ceremony. Ariel Tweto, an Inupiaq TV personality and actress from Unalakleet, says it's an important milestone for Indigenous people.
  • An SD card ,with an almost unimaginable story, turned out to be the key to the murder trial of Brian Smith, a killer who targeted vulnerable Alaska Native women. During the trial, it was revealed that footage on the card came from a cellphone, stolen from Smith. Family members and advocates for Kathleen Henry and Veronica Abouchuk had to hear sounds from Smith's videos and see images that were horrific. And yet they came everyday to seek justice, to remind the court that the women were someone's daughters — and in Abouchuk's case, a mother and a grandmother.
  • After three weeks of testimony, the trial of serial killer Brian Smith came to a quick conclusion Thursday. The jury convicted Smith of all counts against him in the deaths of two Alaska Native women, who he targeted for their vulnerability. National media has followed the Smith murders closely, dubbing them the "Memory Card Murders." During the trial, the jury saw footage and photographs of the killings.
  • The murders of two Alaska Native women, Kathleen Jo Henry and Veronica Abouchuk, have a lot in common. Both women are from Southwest Alaska and each battled homelessness and addiction in Anchorage. The same man, Brian Smith, a South African immigrant, has been charged with their murders.
  • A changing of the guard is ahead for the Alaska Federation of the Natives, which has been under the leadership of Julie Kitka for almost 35 years. The search for a new president will soon get underway, in hopes of having the position filled in time for this October’s AFN convention.
  • Moose have a way of intruding into urban life. In Anchorage, their constant hunger leads them to places with easy pickings — parking lots landscaped with with trees in the dividers — like the one at Costco in East Anchorage. During peak shopping time, this can be a recipe for either trouble, or a source of entertainment.
  • N. Scott Momaday came into the scene during a renaissance of Indigenous culture in the 70s. His first published novel ‘House Made of Dawn’ made him the first Native American to win a Pulitzer Award.Recently he died at the age of 89. Shirley Sneve, a close friend and co-worker on several projects spoke about his impact.
  • Students, teachers and alumnae in the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP) have a tradition of celebrating success with a motivational speaker. This year they heard from a Native American astronaut, John Herrington, who flew on a NASA mission in 2002.