KNBA - KBC

water and sewer

9/20/16

The lack of running water and flush toilets in more than three thousand Alaska homes causes health problems, but another issue looms even larger:  that’s the effects of climate change on drinking water sources. That’s according to scientists at the international Water Innovations for Healthy Arctic Homes conference in Anchorage this week. 

Local governments win against oil companies on value of taxable property

By Associated Press

The Supreme Court in Alaska has upheld a ruling that the trans-Alaska oil pipeline was worth far more than a billion a year the pipeline owners claimed for the years 2007 through 2009. The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reports that the court late last month affirmed a Superior Court ruling in 2011 that the pipeline was worth $8.9 billion to $9.6 billion those years.

Sept. 3, 2015

Change affects whether villages can get funds to fix existing water and sewer systems or only to replace them

By Joaqlin Estus, KNBA, with assistance from Matthew Smith, KNOM

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

Sept. 3, 2015

President Obama names Denali Commission as lead agency for coastal communities threatened by climate change

Based on a story by Zach Hughes, APRN

Wednesday in Kotzebue, President Obama continued his focus on climate change in Alaska by announcing that the Denali Commission will take the lead in dealing with coastal communities threatened by disastrous flooding, erosion and thawing permafrost.

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

The slide show above gives glimpses of life in the dozens of villages in Alaska that lack flush toilets and running water. 

To find out more, click on the links below, Parts 1-5, to see and hear the series "Kick the Bucket: Rural Sanitation in Alaska." 

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

May 1, 2015

Over the past four days, we have brought you stories that go out into the field for an in-depth look at Alaska's rural sanitation situation - a series we call "Kick the Bucket."  We have seen how the lack of modern sanitation is linked to disease as people strain the limits of their clean water supply. And we have looked at the implications of decreasing funding and looming maintenance expenses in villages with a limited cash economy.   Today we’ll wrap up the series by trying to look into the future.

Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, Village Safe Water Program

April 30, 2015

What if you didn’t have piped water and sewer, and the government wasn’t picking up the tab to get you some? How would you find a low-cost system that you could keep running through the winter? In this segment of “Kick the Bucket,” find out how experts are looking for answers to rural sanitation issues in Alaska.

Villagers and people in the water and sewer business can name dozens of ways systems have failed due to parts that shattered in the cold, say, or components that had to be flown in from Europe and installed by a Lower 48 specialist.

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

April 29, 2015

Even rural communities that have raised the money to build modern sanitation systems face the threat of their ultimate failure due to the lack of funding for operations and maintenance, wiping away whatever health gains were achieved.

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation Environmental Health and Engineering Department provides technical assistance to water treatment plant operators in the region. Here’s a bit of the conversation during a recent teleconference.

Bill Griffith, Mike Black / ADEC, ANTHC

April 28, 2015

Most of us have never lived with without running water at home. Today, we’ll learn about some people who are just getting used to it, and others who would like to get used to having running water. In the second segment of the series Kick the Bucket, we’ll also hear some of the reasons Alaska hasn’t made modern plumbing a simple fact of life for all Alaskans.

Dan Winkleman, the president of the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC), described a recent phone call from his mother-in-law in Kwethluk.

April 27

How many times a day do you wash your hands? 

If you have running water, you probably wash your hands many times a day, each time in clean, warm water. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, hand washing consumes one gallon of water per wash.

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