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In the first of two newscasts today: Alaska Democrats have endorsed U.S. Mark Begich for the seat he now holds, former Juneau mayor Byron Mallott for Governor, and Anchorage attorney Forrest Dunbar for U.S. Congress.

The state has requested an evidentiary hearing in the case of the "Fairbanks Four," who were convicted of the beating death of Mark Hartman in 1997, but new information points to others being responsible for the killing.

In the first of two newscasts today: Alaska Democrats have endorsed U.S. Mark Begich for the seat he now holds, former Juneau mayor Byron Mallott for Governor, and Anchorage attorney Forrest Dunbar for U.S. Congress.

The state has requested an evidentiary hearing in the case of the "Fairbanks Four," who were convicted of the beating death of Mark Hartman in 1997, but new information points to others being responsible for the killing.

In the Northwest Arctic Borough, caribou users are concerned about a big drop in the number of caribou, and potential effects of a proposed road through the area.

The National Park Service is developing new regulations on the use of discarded or shed animal parts, such as bones and antlers, in the use of traditional  handicrafts.

The regional Native corporation for southeast Alaska shows a $35 million loss for last year.

U.S. Bank says state employee payroll direct deposits should be complete this morning, and it will cover related banking fees.

An international network meets in Anchorage to discuss mining projects in Canada, Alaska, and on Indian reservations.

The Great Land Trust plans to buy the top of Bodenburg Butte in Palmer from the Alaska Mental Health Lands Trust and donate it to the Mat-Su Borough, if it can raise the $187,500 purchase price.

The Yupiit Nation lays out a strategy for dealing with this summer's king salmon closures and avoiding civil disobedience.

The City of Bethel is investigating employee violations ranging from nepotism, personnel policies and leave policies, to credit card use, procurement, and travel.

After a court ruling that the Department of Interior (DOI) improperly excluded Alaska tribes from a process long available to lower 48 tribes, DOI announced a proposal that would allow it to accept Alaska tribal lands into trust. Although any action is years in the future, the change would provide certain protections to those lands.

A study on the depletion of herring in Southeast Alaska is prompting discussions on whether and how it may be possible to replenish their numbers.

It's taken years of research, experimentation, testing and innovation, but a low maintenance, easy-to-operate wind turbine project is already showing promise of cutting energy costs by as much as 90%.

With the king salmon run due to begin in weeks, tribes on the Kuskokwim River are discussing strategies to keep food on the table without breaking the law.

Second of two newscasts for Wed. 4/16/14: Subsistence users give the Federal Subsistence Board several ideas for changes as it reviews its process for deciding the rural/non-rural status of communities for subsistence priorities.

Gov. Sean Parnell's proposal for paying $3 billion toward state employees retirement debt is moving forward in the Legislature.

One of two newscasts for Wed. 4/16/14: The state of Alaska harshly criticized the Federal Subsistence Board for cutting state fish and game subsistence management funds, not adopting its policy of manipulating habitat and reducing predator numbers, and for not giving it due deference.

Gov. Sean Parnell's proposal to pay down the public employees' retirement debt by $3 billion is moving forward in the Legislature.

Attorney General Michael Geraghty testified before the House Community and Regional Affairs Committee on a national report that calls the high rate of violence against Alaska Native women a "national disgrace," and urges the state to change its position on tribal courts. The state, says Garaghty, is protecting the rights of all Alaskans when it opposes the expansion of tribal courts.

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