KNBA - KBC

TLINGIT

In a science classroom at Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé, students are holding carving knives. Teacher Henry Hopkins walks up and down the rows of desks, showing them how to shape the hunks of yellow cedar in their hands.

“The students were working on traditional Tlingit halibut hooks, which sounds like it’s primarily a Tlingit carving project, but it’s actually a science project,” said Hopkins.

  A rare wooden rattle attributed to a famous Tlingit artist sold at an art auction in California last month. The 230-year-old piece came from a private collector and sold for a half-million dollars.

When Sealaska Heritage Institute Native arts curator Steve Brown first laid eyes on the shaman’s rattle, he was amazed by the piece’s excellent condition.

“Nobody had ever seen this before,” Brown said. “It had just kind of come out of the woodwork.”

About 100 fluent speakers of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian languages are left in Alaska and Canada’s Interior. And a Southeast Alaska cultural center invites them to Juneau for an Alaska Native language summit.

Voices of Our Ancestors” will invite fluent speakers of Lingit, Xaad Kil and Sm’algyax. The three-day regional summit will be Nov. 13-15.

Sealaska Heritage Institute will cover transportation and hotel costs for fluent speakers living in Alaska.

Koahnic Broadcast Corporation

Our Guest today on Morning Line was Ronald Spatz, editor of the Alaska Quarterly Review.  He shared that Shaawatke’é’s Birth, a short film produced for Alaska Quarterly Review's 35th anniversary celebration, is now available on YouTube. 

"Shaawatke'é's Birth is the film version, in Tlingit and English, of a poem published Alaska Quarterly Review by Emily Wall and X'unei Lance Twitchell. "Shaawatke’é’s Birth" is about the birth of a Tlingit child as well as an origin story. It is ultimately a story about how important language is to sustaining a culture and cultural identity."

KTOO - Juneau

Knowing Tlingit makes possible a life of understanding the ways of our elders

By Johanna Eurich

Most of Alaska’s twenty Native languages are going extinct. However, a Native languages assistant professor at the University of Alaska Southeast is bucking that tide. Lance X’uneit Twitchell worked hard to learn Tlingit, a language used by his family for thousands of years. Tlingit people have a rich and complex high civilization along the Pacific coast in Southeast Alaska famous for its totem poles, clan system, regalia, rich poetry and formal rhetoric.

By Johanna Eurich, Independent Producer

Many if not most of Alaska's rural schools are not working.  Low student performance and high teacher turnover are just two of more obvious indicators of problems in these mostly Native school districts. Those working in the schools say it's time for radical changes.

Paul Berg has taught in Alaska for more than 40 years -- ten of them in villages.

Oct. 29, 2015

Buyout of LNG pipeline partner getting close look by Legislators

Oct. 26, 2015

Risks, rewards at issue

By The Associated Press

Republican legislative leaders say they want to know more about the potential risks and rewards of the state buying out gas pipeline project partner TransCanada Corp.

They also want to know how the state would pay for its share.

The Legislature opened a special session Saturday to consider buying out TransCanada's share in the project. As it is now, TransCanada would hold the state's interest in a gas treatment plant and pipeline.

President Obama takes no questions from Alaska media

Sept. 4, 2015

By Zachariah Hughes, APRN

During his visit to Alaska, President Obama did not take a single question from Alaskan reporters. KNOM news director Matthew Smith traveled with the press pool to Kotzebue.

Aug. 18, 2015Arctic offshore drilling gets federal approvalThe federal government has given Royal Dutch Shell the final permit it needs to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean off Alaska's northwest coast for the first time in more than two decades.

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