KNBA - KBC

PERMANENT FUND DIVIDEND

Federal rescue package complicates annual Alaska Permanent Fund dividend debate

Apr 7, 2021

How much will Alaskans receive in permanent fund dividends this year? As the Legislature works its way through the annual budget process, the answer to that question is once again unclear. A new factor shaping the debate this year is the large amount of federal money coming into the state

Governor warns Legislators lack of new revenues jeopardizes Alaska's prosperity; Proposal to cut tax credits for oil and gas producers moves in Legislature; Legislators pass criminal justice reform legislation; Elder concerned broadband access threatens cultural heritage

 Governor Walker says prolonged fiscal uncertainty mars Alaskan economic outlook 

By Joaqlin Estus, KNBA - Anchorage

Feb. 5, 2016

Legislators to hear public comments on proposals to cut into PFDs

By the Associated Press

PFD Voter Registration Initiate Heads to Division of Elections for Signature Verification

Based on a story by Brielle Schaeffer, KCAW – Sitka

Permanent Fund Dividend third largest in 33-year history

This year's PFD will be $1,884. That's twice as much as last year and the third-largest ever. Distribution begins Oct. 2.

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Lawsuit alleges candidate merger of gubernatorial campaigns was unlawful

Alaskans will find out the size of the Permanent Fund dividends in a week. Dividends based on the five-year investment earnings are distributed annually to eligible Alaska residents. KTUU reports three Polaris School students estimated this year's PFD amount at $1,909.  

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PFD applications must be filed online or postmarked by March 31st, Monday.

In Unalaska, city managers work to protect eagle nests... and to protect people who get attacked for inadvertently coming too close.

UAA is hosting a town hall meeting on "Journalism in the Digital Age," facilitated by Atwood Chair of Journalism Mark Trahant.  

Legislators have been inundated with phone calls, e-mails, letters and petitions over the Governor's bill aimed at streamlined permitting, but that critics say gives the state too much authority and leaves the public out of the process.

The Board of Fish has okayed dip-net fishing on the Kuskokwim River to allow fishermen to release King salmon live back into the river and help boost their population.

March 31 is the deadline for enrollment in health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, and for Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend applications.