KNBA - KBC

Ninilchik Traditional Council

 

The partial federal shutdown is putting strain on some Alaska Native tribes and tribal organizations. Some are dipping into reserves in order to pay for services that the federal government usually covers.

Federally recognized tribes in Alaska are missing some payments from the federal government during the partial shutdown.

Tribes are eligible for funding through federal agencies either directly or through contracts, grants or other agreements.

By Daysha Eaton, KBBI - Homer

For years, the Ninilchik tribe has been seeking — and last week was granted — approval to use a more effective method of catching its subsistence allocation of Kenai River sockeye salmon. The change in gear type has raised concerns about its take of king salmon, a fishery that's been in decline for several years.

Rather than dip netting, the Ninilchik Traditional Council can now set a gill net.

By Daysha Eaton, KBBI - Homer

For years, the Ninilchik Traditional Council has been seeking approval to use a more effective method of catching their subsistence allocation of sockeye salmon on the Kenai River. Late last week, they got that opportunity. 

On July 27, the Federal Subsistence Board approved the tribe’s emergency special action request to operate a community subsistence set net fishery on the Kenai. Approval came after a lawsuit filed in 2015. Before, the tribe was approved for dipnetting and rod-and-reel subsistence fishing on the Kenai.

Jan. 13, 2016

Report Finds No Wrongdoing in EPA Study of Pebble Mine

By the Associated Press

A watchdog agency has found no evidence of bias in how the Environmental Protection Agency conducted a study on the potential effects of large-scale mining on a world-premiere salmon fishery in Alaska's Bristol Bay region. The inspector general for the EPA also found no evidence that the agency predetermined the study's outcome. Pebble is challenging the EPA's role in federal court.

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