KNBA - KBC

Gwitchin

August 19, 2016

By Molly Dischner, KDLG - Dillingham

When Alaskans went to the polls this week, some had new options for language assistance. Expanded help for Yup’ik, Gwich’in and Inupiaq speakers was the result of a lawsuit brought against the state in 2013. A team of state elections officials and those involved in the lawsuit traveled to three Bristol Bay communities to see how the provisions worked out on primary day.

U.S. Senate candidates Mark Begich and Dan Sullivan woo Alaska Native voters

As KYUK's Ben Matheson reports, this year's U.S. Senate race in Alaska is shattering spending records, with tens of millions of dollars from outside Alaska going mostly toward TV ads. With less than two months to go before the general election, the two candidates are also seeking an edge on the ground in rural Alaska.

KYUK's Daysha Eaton reports Native American Rights Fund attorneys representing Yup'ik and Gwitchin speakers have responded to the state's plan for providing translations for elections. The state's proposed plan addresses a state Supreme Court order to improve translation of voting materials into Native languages before the Nov. 4 election. The NARF attorneys asked that the state have: 

1)  Bilingual help in every community where it's needed, in advance of and on election day.

Alaskans will find out the size of the Permanent Fund dividends in a week. Dividends based on the five-year investment earnings are distributed annually to eligible Alaska residents. KTUU reports three Polaris School students estimated this year's PFD amount at $1,909.  

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A scathing report into allegations of sexual assault in the Alaska National Guard finds victims lack confidence in leadership, and fear retaliation for reporting misconduct. At Governor Sean Parnell's request in February, the National Guard Bureau Office of Complex Investigations reviewed documents going back several years and interviewed hundreds of guard members. Investigators found the Guard lacked standard procedures for handling complaints about sexual assault, misconduct, and hostile work environments.