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food security

Amid food supply chain concerns, Tribal governments request emergency hunts

Apr 22, 2020

As uncertainty about the COVID-19 virus continues to mount, Tribal governments and remote communities across the state are concerned about disruptions in the food supply chain.

That’s led to numerous requests for emergency hunts, which are now piling up for federal and state agencies.

Seed sellers work overtime as gardeners stock up to allay coronavirus fears

Apr 16, 2020

Nick Schlosstein opens a filing drawer, reaches into a file called “Basil,” and pulls out a plastic baggie of small black seeds. He’s filling seed packets — a job he thought he finished weeks ago.

He and his wife Leah Wagner own and operate Foundroot, a small Alaska seed company. March is usually their busiest month, but this year is different. Seed orders are coming in at a rate the couple didn’t anticipate.

Office of the Governor of Alaska

9/12/16

By the Associated Press

Alaska imports 96 percent of its food, and the governor said that should change. The Juneau Empire reports Gov. Bill Walker spoke during a conference for the National Association of Farmer's Market Nutrition Programs.

He said population growth since statehood helped reduce the percentage of locally-grown food that residents consumed from half to 4 percent. He said he would like to see significant growth in the percentage of Alaska-grown food. Walker noted there are now 42 farmers markets statewide compared to 11 in 2004.

Alaska Supreme Court Chief Justice asks Legislators to keep justice system whole

Alaska Supreme Court Chief Justice Dana Fabe yesterday [Wednesday] gave her annual State of the Judiciary address to lawmakers. With legislators looking for ways to cut state spending, Fabe made the case for preserving the judicial branch’s budget.

kml.gina.alaska.edu

Here is the last in KNBA’s 5-part series on Climate Change and Alaska Natives.

As we’ll see, the effects of warming temperatures on infrastructure can be costly and sometimes dramatic.

In much of Alaska, bridges, roads, buildings, and runways have been built on permafrost. That’s soil that became frozen during ice ages from 400 to 10,000 years ago, and a few feet down is frozen rock-hard year around.

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA 90.3 FM

Yesterday (Thursday) Alaskans shared some of the concerns about and hopes for the Arctic with the newly appointed U.S. Special Representative for the Arctic. Admiral Robert Papp is no stranger to Alaska, though. He first traveled above the Arctic Circle in 1976, during his first tour of duty in the Coast Guard, and returned several times as Coast Guard Commandant.

Governor Sean Parnell says it would be immoral to leave the state's debt to public employees' retirement benefits for future generations to pay, so he's proposing moving $3 billion out of savings to pay it down.

Food security from an Inuit perspective is the top agenda item at the Inuit Circumpolar Council's meeting in Nome this week.