KNBA - KBC

commercial fishing

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game says its massive hatchery-wild research study will inform the conversations surrounding the rates at which hatchery pink and chum salmon stray into wild streams and whether they’re less productive than their wild counterparts.

Thousands of people in the Pacific Northwest — commercial fishermen, their crews, sport fishermen, seafood processors, even many boat builders — depend on wild salmon caught every summer in Alaska’s Bristol Bay. The Trump administration has re-started permitting for a controversial mining project there — and locals are gearing up to fight it.

By Daysha Eaton, KBBI - Homer

For years, the Ninilchik tribe has been seeking — and last week was granted — approval to use a more effective method of catching its subsistence allocation of Kenai River sockeye salmon. The change in gear type has raised concerns about its take of king salmon, a fishery that's been in decline for several years.

Rather than dip netting, the Ninilchik Traditional Council can now set a gill net.

By Daysha Eaton, KBBI - Homer

For years, the Ninilchik Traditional Council has been seeking approval to use a more effective method of catching their subsistence allocation of sockeye salmon on the Kenai River. Late last week, they got that opportunity. 

On July 27, the Federal Subsistence Board approved the tribe’s emergency special action request to operate a community subsistence set net fishery on the Kenai. Approval came after a lawsuit filed in 2015. Before, the tribe was approved for dipnetting and rod-and-reel subsistence fishing on the Kenai.

By Daysha Eaton, KYUK

The Alaska Court of Appeals has affirmed a lower court’s decision that Yup’ik Fishermen who fished for King salmon during a state closure should be convicted. The decision was issued Friday (March 27). 

The Attorney for the Yup’ik Fishermen is James Davis with the Northern Justice Project. He says the court asked the wrong question:

Hundreds of people turned out in Anchorage Tuesday to comment on a proposal that would severely restrict development of the massive gold-and-copper Pebble mine in the Bristol Bay region Opponents of the mine say it poses to great a threat to salmon. Others say the project should be allowed to move through the permitting process before any action is taken to curtail development.

As KSKA's Ann Hillman reports, about 90 people attended a Regulatory Commission of Alaska meeting to ask it to reconsider its decision to approve Enstar's request for a 50% price increase for natural gas.