KNBA - KBC

Climate Change

As the Arctic warms, the Inupiat adapt

Aug 24, 2020

Utqiagvik sits at the very tip of the United States, saddled against the Arctic Ocean. The Alaska Native Inupiat are set apart from other Indigenous peoples by their subsistence hunting of the bowhead whale. Even today, this unique, centuries-old practice determines the social structure, reflects community values and supplements the people’s nutrient-rich diet.

Podcaster, journalist work together to create climate change collaboration

Aug 6, 2020

At a time where virtual platforms are largely becoming the norm, many Alaska Natives are entering a new era of content creation. I recently sat down with Alice Qannik Glenn and Jenna Kunze to talk about their new Indigenous-centered project on climate change.

Researchers take on berry timing amid climate change

Jul 14, 2020

Alaska’s summer is short, but one of the ways it softens the farewell each fall is through a parting gift of delicious berries. In the late summer and early fall, Kenai Peninsula residents regularly flock to the wild lands for salmonberries, cranberries, blueberries, and crowberries and more.

Want a peek at our hotter future? Go to Alaska

Sep 24, 2019

SEWARD, Alaska — Drip. Drip. Drip.

It's the sound of one glacier melting. It’s also the sound of a whole planet careening into uncharted territory.

I am crouching by the mouth of a little ice cave underneath the Exit Glacier, a huge river of ice on the Kenai Peninsula in southcentral Alaska. Ancient ice drips from the roof of the cave onto newly bare earth. Twice in a few minutes, I hear rocks fall from the freshly exposed landscape at the glacier’s snout and decide this is not the safest place to be.

Alaska’s most recent plan to address climate change was removed from the state’s website back in December. Meanwhile, some municipalities and tribal governments are moving ahead with their own ideas about how to respond to the growing problem.

Cutting through a 6-inch-thick layer of blubber demands a sharp knife.

What does warmer temperatures and changing ice mean for whalers?

May 13, 2019

On the North Slope of Alaska, the Iñupiat tradition of hunting bowhead whales has an ancestry more than 1,500 years old.

Today in Utqiaġvik there are two annual hunts when the whales pass by on their migration. The fall hunt has historically been done on open water, and the spring hunt from the ice that attaches to the coast each winter.

In kelp forests, scientists seek climate change refuge for herring roe

Apr 19, 2019

Aerial surveys of Sitka Sound showed a lot of active herring spawn this week, stretching over 31 nautical miles to date. But that wasn’t the only place to find roe. In the basement of the Sitka Sound Science Center  researchers are incubating thousands of herring eggs to determine the effects of warming ocean temperatures and ocean acidification on the species — now and in the future. 

Seals adapt - so far - to shrinking sea ice

Feb 11, 2019

Ice seals thought to be most affected by the disappearance of arctic sea ice seem to be doing well, according to data presented at the Alaska Marine Science Sympo

As Heard on Morning Line: No Planet B

Aug 11, 2017
Koahnic Broadcast Corporation

Guests this Morning on Our Community were Sandy Harper and Shala Dobson, discussing a series of events surrounding an art installation at Side Street Espresso in Anchorage entitled No Planet B. 

Events include Chalk Art at noon Saturday the 12th,

Poetry readings by Joan Kane, Priscilla Hensley & Carrie Ojanen on August 19th at 1pm, and a Panel Discussion, Climate Change 101 moderated by Fran Ulmer August 24th starting at 5pm. 

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