KNBA - KBC

caribou

One thing lies at the heart of Gwich’in tribes’ opposition to oil development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: caribou.

At Arctic Village’s annual spring carnival in April, men gathered around a plastic folding table for a contest to see who could skin a caribou leg the fastest. Their knives worked swiftly from knee to cloven hoof, hands tugging meat, tendon and hide from bone.

April 29, 2016

Legislators to put Power Cost Equalization excess earnings to other uses

By Associated Press

House and Senate negotiators have reached agreement for use of any excess earnings from a fund set up to help rural areas faced with high electricity costs. A conference committee Thursday agreed to legislation that would allow for 70 percent of excess earnings from the Power Cost Equalization endowment fund to be put to other uses. Sen. Lyman Hoffman says the remaining 30 percent of any excess earnings would revert to the endowment.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is considering designating some 35,000 square miles of ocean in the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort seas as special habitat for ringed seals, which are the main prey of polar bears. The seals were declared threatened in 2012 due to the loss of sea ice from climate warming. Ringed seals use sea ice for breeding and molting.

In the Northwest Arctic Borough, caribou users are concerned about a big drop in the number of caribou, and potential effects of a proposed road through the area.

The National Park Service is developing new regulations on the use of discarded or shed animal parts, such as bones and antlers, in the use of traditional  handicrafts.

The regional Native corporation for southeast Alaska shows a $35 million loss for last year.