KNBA - KBC

Bering Strait

Bering Strait athletes have winning days at WEIO

Aug 12, 2019

This year's World Eskimo Indian Olympics, or WEIO, finished with athletes from the Bering Strait region taking home top honors in multiple events. The four-day event ran from July 17 to 20 in Fairbanks.

Athletes from Nome, Unalakleet, Shishmaref and other regional communities spent a good deal of time on the podium during competition.

Sovereignty over tribal lands the subject of Gov. Walker meetings in rural Alaska

In 2006 tribes sued the federal government over the right to transfer tribal lands into federal ownership, or trust status, which would give tribes wider control over laws and management of lands, while restricting the power of the state. Trust status also has tax implications. The state of Alaska argued Alaskan tribal rights to apply to put land into trust were extinguished by the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971.

Will Congress take the first step to building a deep-water port in the Alaska Arctic?

A U.S. House Subcommittee Wednesday considered a bill that would divide a 2,000 acre spit, Point Spencer on the Bering Strait, among the Coast Guard, the state, and Bering Strait Native Corporation, with the aim of creating a deep-water port. U.S. Congressman Don Young, of Alaska, says the project is badly needed for Alaska and for the nation.

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Drug abuse-related arrests in Alaska are on the decline

Alaskans will find out the size of the Permanent Fund dividends in a week. Dividends based on the five-year investment earnings are distributed annually to eligible Alaska residents. KTUU reports three Polaris School students estimated this year's PFD amount at $1,909.  

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CoastAlaska's Ed Schoenfeld reports a tailings dam break at a British Columbia copper and gold mine could threaten Southeast Alaska salmon fisheries, according to critics who say similar dams closer to the border could suffer the same fate, polluting Alaskan waters.

The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $888,000 to the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium for research on climate change and contaminant shifts, and effects on human health in rural communities. The grant is one of six given out nationwide. The study will focus on traditional foods.