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Alaska Native

Climate change, Alaska Native issues high profile during President Obama visit to Alaska

Alaska Native issues will be the subject of high-level international attention during President Obama’s three-day visit to Alaska that begins today [Monday]. The president has scheduled a listening session with Alaska Native leaders today to discuss climate change, and economic issues. He’s expected to announce a new initiative to help dozens of Native communities facing destruction by erosion and flooding due to the effects of climate change.

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA 90.3 FM

Witnesses endorse tribal courts as a solution 

By Joaqlin Estus, KNBA

Alaska has already outgrown the $250-million Goose Creek Correctional Center that opened in 2012. Instead of pouring more money into building and maintaining prisons, people testifying in a U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs field hearing in Anchorage on Thursday said it’d be smarter to turn some of the money toward keeping people out of prison. 

KNBA newscast for Thursday, August 13, 2015

VA Secretary honors WWII-era Alaska Native militia

By The Associated Press

Wednesday in Kotzebue, Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert McDonald honored those who served in the Alaska Territorial Guard during World War II. He addressed seven surviving members of the largely Alaska Native militia, thanking them for their service. Members of the militia weren't formally recognized by the Army at U.S. military veterans

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  Alaska's largest tribe is boycotting FedEx, a sponsor of the Washington, D.C. NFL team whose name and mascot many consider derogatory to Native Americans. The Juneau Empire reports the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska announced Thursday that it has told tribal employees use of FedEx services will be discontinued.  FedEx is one of the team's top sponsors and owns naming rights to the Washington D.C. stadium. 

Wayside closures will affect travelers on Glenn, Richardson and Tok Cutoff highways

By Alexandra Gutierrez, APRN

The Alaska House and Senate have reached a deal on the state’s operating budget. For weeks, the two bodies have been at an impasse over whether to fund cost-of-living raises for public employees. House Democrats argued that the state should not go back on its contract with state workers, while Senate Republicans held that it was inappropriate to grant them a pay increase when the state faces a multi-billion-dollar deficit. The House Republican majority acted as a go between.

“Alaska is, frankly, the best model that should be exported to other parts of the country."

Ten years ago, the American Dental Association unsuccessfully sued to get the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium to halt its Alaska Dental Health Therapist (DHAT) program. Now that program has won a national award for its innovative approach to providing Alaska Natives with dental care. And the idea is expanding to other states.

Conference Committee, House and Senate scheduled to meet Friday

Representatives of the state House and Senate serving on the Legislative Conference Committee are scheduled to meet tomorrow at 10 a.m. Their assignment is to come up with a compromise operating budget. The Senate calendar shows it plans to convene tomorrow at 11 a.m. and the House at 2 p.m. Friday. Lay off warning notices were sent Monay to about 10-thousand state employees, giving them 30-days-notice they’ll be laid off if the Legislature doesn’t pass a budget by July 1.

The U.S. Congress yesterday [Tuesday] unanimously adopted legislation to create a Commission on Native American children. That's according to a prepared statement by bill sponsor U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski. The 11-member commission will study and develop recommendations on ways to combine and coordinate federal programs and funding for Alaska Native, American Indian, and Native Hawaiian children.

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

 Housing to increase access to health services for Alaska Natives

Tribal, federal, state, and private sector leaders Wednesday {may 20, 2015] kicked off construction of housing at the Alaska Native Medical Center saying it will improve services for Alaska Native and American Indian people who travel to Anchorage from across the state for health care. A state Senator who helped get the project financed says it will also save the state millions of dollars a year for years to come. 

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