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Author Michael Walker says that by the end of the 1960s, you could fairly say there were two generations of baby boomers: those who had experienced that decade's peace-and-love era of music firsthand, and those who learned about it from their older brothers and sisters.

Nearly 30 years and 13 albums into a career marked by tireless creativity and remarkable consistency, Yo La Tengo's Georgia Hubley, Ira Kaplan and James McNew are much-loved and highly influential pioneers. That word seems as accurate a label as any, especially given that they laughed off the notion of being "godfathers" during our interview.

The rock club Maxwell's is a tiny space that's hosted some of the biggest names in music for more than 30 years. R.E.M., Nirvana and many more bands have squeezed onto Maxwell's stage in Hoboken, N.J. Native son Bruce Springsteen recorded the music video for "Glory Days" there.

After a long flurry of activity culminating in the release of The Decemberists' 2011 album The King Is Dead, frontman Colin Meloy announced his long-running, best-selling band would take a lengthy hiatus.

Andrew Bird's records have grown quieter and more intimate in recent years, but he remains a remarkably dynamic live performer: Last year's Break It Yourself wouldn't seem to be the stuff of blockbuster live shows, and yet when he took it to the stage, he injected its characteristically smart, brooding songs with surprising intensity. Of course, it helps that, 12 albums into an unpredictable career, Bird has become a cult superstar whose fans clearly fuel him onstage.

Brandi Carlile came back to Anchorage this summer to see friends, catch some fish and of course share her great music with her Anchorage fans! KNBA Afternoon Drive host Shyanne spoke to her by phone the day before her show at the Wendy Williamson Auditorium.

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